Event

JMax Productions
Dub Trio
Sat September 21, 2019 8:00 pm PDT (Doors: 7:30 pm )
Domino Room , 51 NW Greenwood Avenue, Bend, OR (map)
All Ages
Tickets available locally at Ranch Records (117 NW Oregon Ave)

Every time we wake up, we return to life. Shaking off slumber, the world seemingly begins anew in front of our eyes.

Dub Trio underwent such an awakening. Over nearly two decades together, the Brooklyn triumvirate—Stu Brooks [bass], DP Holmes [guitar], and Joe Tomino [drums]—not only delivered a string of albums that forever redefined the term “dub”under cover of metal, punk, alternative, and shoegaze, but also infused its musical prowess into the studio recordings and the shows of genre-bending icons ranging from Mike Patton to Lady Gaga. The three-piece introduced itself on 2004’s “live-dub experiment” Exploring the Dangers Of followed by successors New Heavy [2006], Another Sound Is Dying [2008], and IV [2011]. Conjuring up instrumental music hummable enough to sing, praise came from the likes of Pitchforkwho predicted “Dub Trio are on to something.” Along the way, the guys served as Peeping Tom’s live band and toured alongside everyone from Clutch to Gogol Bordello and Dillinger Escape Plan.

“The band has been in hibernation, and now we’ve awakened,” smiles Brooks. “It took a while just by virtue of the fact everyone was in a different geographical location. Once we got together, we rehearsed for a few days, hit the studio, tracked, and mixed everything within two weeks. It has a different energy. It’s more fresh. The first time playing these songs was three days before we hit ‘record.’ That’s a big part of the record’s identity. We needed a little bit of a break, because we’d gone so hard for fifteen years. Joe had a baby. Dave had a baby. In the rehearsal room, it was like no time had passed though. There was a little bit of nostalgia and sentimentality. We fell into our usual patterns and continued.”

Elsewhere, “Life Signs” borders on dark industrial with its glitchy electronic swells, and “Spider” crawls with a menacing intensity. At the center, “Forget My Name Dub” [feat. Meshell Ndegeocello] emanates soothing transmissions from the vocal phenomenon upheld by forward-facing reggae rhythms and sparse production. It personifies the title, The Shape of Dub To Come. “We were a dub/reggae band, and we started implementing what we thought was cool from The Refused and bands like that,” explains Brooks. “The Shape of Dub To Come describes our whole method; applying dub as a process to virtually any style of music. The future of dub doesn’t have to be just reggae. It’s a process rather than a genre.”
In the end, Dub Trio are awake and staring into a bright future.

“These songs come together like chapters of a book,” Tomino leaves off. “It’s an auditory snapshot of the individuals and the collective—where we were and where we are. It’s a big arc that spans everything from our roots to metal and ambient electronic music. It’s a big picture of little snapshots.”
“We hope you listen to the whole thing from start to finish,” concludes Brooks. “It takes you on a journey and tells a story. Hopefully, you end up in a different place at the end. We certainly did.”